-1

Following up this question:

How to word “advantage/disadvantage” or “arguments for/against” questions?

... and the suggestion in the Private Beta Extension discussion that it (among others) should receive a little more attention, here is a poll:

Should one, both or neither of the following forms of words be encouraged or discouraged on politics.stackexchange.com?

  • "What are the advantages and disadvantages of X?"

  • "What are the main arguments in favour of and against X?"

closed as not constructive by SoylentGray, Shog9 Dec 13 '12 at 15:47

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  • You are trying to ban words... it is not the words that are the problem but context of them – SoylentGray Dec 13 '12 at 14:14
  • 2
    This is... Really not a great way to resolve this issue. I'd say start a discussion, but there are already several - please just participate in them. It's more important that we flush out reasoned arguments now than anything else. – Shog9 Dec 13 '12 at 15:46
1

We should encourage "What are the main arguments in favour of and against X?" and discourage "What are the advantages and disadvantages of X?".

  • 1
    I am supporting this one over the others. The reason: In and out of themselves "adv/disadv" questions are not a problem in SE format (leaving aside the usual "this is a list question" complaints). But as usual, in politics even the definition of what poses an advantage and disadvantage would be subjective, both in terms of "does X ACTUALLY offer Y as advantage", and "is Y an advantage in the first place?". – user4012 Dec 11 '12 at 19:17
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    On Christianity.SE, I find myself almost always wanting to understand Why someone believes X. By asking "Why does X support Z," I learn about perspectives other than my own. This phrasing comes pretty close to that. – Affable Geek Dec 12 '12 at 23:57
-2

We should discourage both "What are the advantages and disadvantages of X?" and "What are the main arguments in favour of and against X?".

-2

We should neither encourage nor discourage either; both are fine.

-5

We should encourage "What are the advantages and disadvantages of X?" and discourage "What are the main arguments in favour of and against X?".