-1

There are many public policy and law questions that benefit from positioning respondents in contrasting or even adversarial positions, for example taking a pro or con position on a question. Case law obviously comes to mind and it's one of the reasons dissenting views and opinions are published. They have merit in their own right even though they are minority views. Even for non law related questions, most of the serious ones that had depth to them were argued from multiple points of view.

To give an example, if I posed the question is there a right to privacy in the Constitution after Roe vs Wade, all merry hell would break loose on this site. To understand this particular question correctly it's really necessary to give both sides of the argument a fair shake as they will start off at a similar point but end up in vastly different spots.

I would therefore like an adversarial question feature that would enable upvoting and responses for both "pro" or "con" responses that would promote looking at two or more sides of complicated issues.

| |
  • 5
    You still seem to mistake politics.SE for a debate website. – Philipp Nov 3 '16 at 16:00
  • More like a dissenting view or a contrarian view. Although it would be great if you all sponsored a debate. – K Dog Nov 3 '16 at 18:33
3

I think this feature already exists. The question "Is there a right to privacy in the Constitution after Roe vs Wade?" is on topic and has an objective answer: Yes, according to the supreme court insert quotes from majority opinion in Roe v. Wade and Griswold v. Connecticut.

The question "What are the arguments that the supreme court overstepped its authority and created a new right to privacy not previously in the constitution in Roe v. Wade and Griswold v. Connecticut?" is similarly on topic and objectively answerable, citing dissenting opinions and scholars of constitutional law and American politics.

If you think the first question leaves readers with a one sided account, you can ask the second question and link it to the first.

| |

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .