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Placing this question What were the political reasons for the U.S. using the stripes of the British East India Company flag on the U.S. national flag? "on hold" for the reasons stated

"The primary purpose of this question appears to be to promote or discredit a specific political cause, group or politician. It does not appear to be a good-faith effort to learn more about governments, policies and political processes as defined in the help center." – Bobson, bytebuster, Rupert Morrish "This question does not appear to be about governments, policies and political processes within the scope defined in the help center." – JJJ, grovkin

makes absolutely no sense. Neither the original question nor any comments made by this user "promote or discredit a specific political cause, group or politician". The political reasons for designing or adopting the design of an existing flag of a nation is "about governments, policies and political processes".

The question does not "promote or discredit a specific political cause, group or politician" and is squarely "about governments, policies and political processes".

Kindly re-open the question.

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I think your question has little bearing on today's politics. It doesn't even have bearing on contemporary politics (which is broader, +-1945 and onward).

If you think your question is relevant you should indicate and explain that is the case in your question. As it is now, a reasonable person (myself included), cannot make the connection to politics today (or even contemporary history).

Instead, it is more of a history question. While history questions can sometimes be considered on-topic, I don't see why a question about a decision centuries ago is still relevant today. If you believe it is, kindly indicate by providing a convincing argument in your question.

  • Your answer makes no sense. You are not the arbiter of what "has bearing on today's politics" and the arbitrary date of "1945" still further makes less sense. The stripes on the current U.S. flag are derived, adopted or copied from the East India Company. The question asks what were the political reasons for the U.S. adopting those stripes. They did not have to do that. – guest271314 Oct 16 '18 at 23:43
  • @guest271314 indeed I am not, so feel free to provide an argument why you think it is relevant. – JJJ Oct 16 '18 at 23:45
  • The original question itself provides the argument and relevancy. Not that have to prove anything to you specifically or anyone else; as if you are the arbiter of what is politically relevant; which you are not. There was no mention of the EIC in U.S. public schools, nor that the Grand Union Flag is identical to the EIC flag. That is a glaring and very huge omission from social studies, history and political science courses in public schools. The question is squarely a political one. – guest271314 Oct 16 '18 at 23:48
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    @guest271314 I am not, but given the SE model my opinion on the matter is taken into account. If 5 other people deem the question to be relevant they will reopen it. I'm not entirely sure what you're trying to achieve by repeating the same rhetoric over and over again. I never claimed to be the (sole) arbiter of anything. ;) – JJJ Oct 16 '18 at 23:50
  • Am repeating the same statements because there is nothing to change. You have failed to answer how the design and adoption of a nation's national flag is not "about governments, policies and political processes", therefore, it is you who needs to explain how you came to that conclusion to vote citing that reason; a government, policies and political processes" are required in order to design or adopt a national flag? Are you missing the word national here? That is, if one were to suggest changing the current U.S. flag, "a government, policies and political processes" are required. – guest271314 Oct 16 '18 at 23:53
  • @guest271314 when did the US first take over those stripes on its flag? – JJJ Oct 17 '18 at 0:00
  • According to "Wikipedia" 1775 Grand Union Flag; see also Flag of the East India Company (est. 1600) "The flag of the East India Company is considered to have inspired the Grand Union Flag, the first flag of the United States, as the two flags were of the same design.". Kindly answer the question posed at the previous comment as to your cited reason for voting to close; precisely how the design of a national flag is not "about governments, policies and political processes"? – guest271314 Oct 17 '18 at 0:19
  • If we relied on "Wikipedia" as a secondary source, which we do not, the question would be answered. I.e., if you cite "Wikipedia" for "contemporary", cite "Wikipedia" for "This was a way of symbolising American loyalty to the Crown as well as the United States' aspirations to be self-governing, as was the East India Company. Some colonists also felt that the Company could be a powerful ally in the American War of Independence, as they shared similar aims and grievances against the British government tax policies. Colonists therefore flew the Company's flag, to endorse the Company." – guest271314 Oct 17 '18 at 0:32
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    @guest271314 I never said the design of a national flag cannot be on-topic. Given how long ago the decision in your question was taken, this particular question is no longer on-topic (though it might have been a few centuries ago). If you still don't see my point after reading your comment citing those years, please take a moment to reflect. – JJJ Oct 17 '18 at 0:32
  • However, the question asks for in depth political insight into the political reasons why. If those reasons are not known, that is a valid answer. Claiming that the U.S. flag design is not identical to the EIC flag design - and then voting to close the question - would tend more to the notion of "The primary purpose of this question appears to be to promote or discredit a specific political cause, group or politician. It does not appear to be a good-faith effort to learn more about governments, policies and political processes" than the question itself. – guest271314 Oct 17 '18 at 0:35
  • "Given how long ago the decision in your question was taken, this particular question is no longer on-topic" That makes less sense than your initial argument about "1945" being some red line in political questions and answers. Time is not a barrier to political questions and answers whatsoever. Not sure how you even came to that idea? There are political topics that have been "on-topic" for at least 2,000 years; and highly unlikely to be discarded, as your position takes. In fact, have not ever read such a position; that "how long ago" a political event occurred affects its relevance today. – guest271314 Oct 17 '18 at 0:38
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    @guest271314 time is a factor. That's why there are two history SE sites. One for history in general and one for history of science and maths. You're likely to get a better answer there because those people are focused on things that happened a long time ago. – JJJ Oct 17 '18 at 0:41
  • You are basing your perception of time on your own ideas and trying to superimpose your arbitrary notions of relevance onto others. That is not the reason you cited for voting to close the question and you still have failed to answer precisely how the design and continued use of a flag is not about governments and political processes. "a long time ago" is entirely arbitrary. What is "a long time ago" to you? 100, 400 years? 200 years is only 4 generations; 4 50-years lifetimes. That is not "a long time". There are ongoing political controversies in the U.S. since its inception, for 200 years. – guest271314 Oct 17 '18 at 0:43
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    @guest271314 your question isn't about the 'continued use of the flag'. It's about a historic decision. I closed because in my view it is outside the scope of this SE site. – JJJ Oct 17 '18 at 0:50
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    @guest271314 we're going in a circle now. My reply here still reflects my position. – JJJ Oct 17 '18 at 0:56
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I agree with JJJ's answer that this is more history than politics. That said, we do support some overlap, depending on the question and subject.

Originally I was OK with this question - I didn't consider it a good question (no upvote), but it was about flags (which are political) so I didn't vote to close it or downvote it.

But over the course of interacting with the poster in comments, I became convinced that it wasn't asked in (what I consider to be) good faith, so voted to close for that reason. Specifically, the poster either already knows the answer they want to see (chat, chat, comment, etc) and refuses to accept anything else or else is making a bad assertion (as per the meta post) in the question and not being willing to accept a challenge to that assertion.

I will fully admit I've had run-ins with this user before and may be biased, but I try to address each question separately.

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