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I'm trying to search for a deleted answer to a question, having no luck, and am wondering if there is a capability to see what questions or answers any moderator has deleted in total. Sort of like how questions and answers are associated with a profile.

Or failing that, just a list of deleted questions and/or answers.

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    This might already be answered on Meta Stack Exchange, since it's not specific to the Politics meta. – Bobson Sep 24 '19 at 22:55
  • I bet there is a way to do this but the server/database admins at SO may only have access to see it. Certainly they log these sort of operations behind the scenes with auditing, etc. – President Bernie Sanders Sep 24 '19 at 23:37
  • @PresidentBernieSanders IIRC, Stack exchange does(or at least use to) expose an api you can use to do advanced queries of data. – Sam I am says Reinstate Monica Sep 25 '19 at 2:43
  • You have 10K rep, so I think you can see deleted answers to questions, if you found the question of course. It's a lot harder to find deleted questions though. The other thing you ask about, i.e. to see a moderator's delete stats is a bit different. Give that a lot of user-profile stats are not public, I'm not seeing that changing. (I think mods can access those stats though.) – Fizz Sep 25 '19 at 3:40
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No, so far as I know, there is no way to search by the person who deleted a question. As of 2015, though, there is a way to limited way to get a list of deleted questions using SEDE. This meta answer explains in more detail: https://meta.stackexchange.com/a/331577/388335

In short, if you got to https://data.stackexchange.com/politics, you can compose a SQL query to search in the PostsWithDeleted table. This will provide only a limited selection of data: the postid (letting you find the question), creation date, deletion date, score, id of parent question (if an answer) and tags (if a question).

That's not much to go on, but it's not supposed to be easy to find deleted questions. The other answers in that meta question discuss other options, but none that are likely to do what you want.

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