19

Even though you can always change your accepted answer at any time, most people read an "accepted answer" as a signal that you're satisfied with that answer and aren't really looking for anything else. Therefore, people are generally less likely to take the time to write an answer to a question that already has an accepted answer. By accepting an answer ...


10

Answering as I was the first close-voter. :) I believe that the CMV format (as well as ELI5 and many others) is an invitation to an open-ended debate. There is no criteria like "Okay, at this point the question is fully answered". There is neither way to judge whether a certain answer actually answers the question. It's like "what is your favorite food?" — ...


10

You'll find similar wording for across SE -- it's not specific to Politics. The privilege to post a comment anywhere requires 50 rep. Before that you can only post comments in specific circumstances, such as replying to a comment on your own answer. In spirit, the whole point of not allowing newcomers to comment everywhere is to silence them until they've ...


8

As far as I know, there are no specific rules on this, but it's generally seen as sensible to wait for 24 hours on any stack so that people from all time zones have an equal chance to chip in, and aren't discouraged from giving their perspective. That said, it really is a personal choice.


8

The answer by Nij already pointed out one important factor regarding when questions about law are on-topic and when they are off-topic: "What is the law?" vs. "Why is this the law?". But I would like to point out a different aspect which can make a question off-topic: Politics Stack Exchange is not a complaint forum. Politics means looking at the bigger ...


7

Questions of "why" a law is as it is, are about politics and should be asked here. Questions of "what" the law is (or was), and should be asked on Law Stack Exchange. For your specific examples, is clearly a question about political motivation. What the law is, is clear (federal supremacy) but why it isn't applied as written requires an explanation ...


5

There's no hard-and-fast rule,1 but I've always found that 48 hours, at a minimum, is a good length of time to wait before accepting an answer. This is for two reasons: Politics.SE (like any *.SE) has users from all over the world, and, more specifically, from time zones all over the world. Waiting 48 hours before accepting an answer gives users from ...


1

>1,000 words: (xkcd.com) An "Accept" does not deter new answers, contrary to what is believed. There was/is even a hat for it in Winter Bash (answering after an accepted answer, and your answer gets accepted). I think the help center sums it up nicely: Accepting an answer is not meant to be a definitive and final statement indicating that the question ...


1

This question isn't of much quality. Your (accepted) answer to it was basically "we can only speculate". Frankly leaving it deleted would have been not much worse than what we have now; where we have a closed question with the answer "we can only speculate"...


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