16

I think these flag questions are okay in general. Flags are a type of political messaging, meant to convey one's affiliation. In that sense, I would compare them to rhetoric questions which ask about the meaning of political messages. Just like an insignia or a slogan, a flag can be a way to convey such a message. These flag questions are mostly objective, ...


14

Simply put it is a question that already knows the answer that it is looking for or more specifically is a question that is looking to support the position of that author and does not care about any answers that does not support that belief. A simplified example of a push question would be asking if something is true and providing evidence of why the author ...


12

The close reason for this ("the primary purpose of this question appears to be to promote or discredit a specific political cause, group or politician") was proposed here. In the simpler terms mentioned there, such questions are a "rant in disguise". If I were to make finer typology of such questions: The most obvious case is when ...


11

If you look at the question under the democratic-primary tag and sort by date, then you will notice that most of the questions were asked in 2019 and 2020. During that time the Republicans had an incumbent President, so the Republican primaries in that election period were mostly a formality. Which explains why there was little interest in that topic. I am ...


10

I can't speak for all the downvotes, but I was one of them for a reason that came up several times in the comments and was pointed out in the answers: there is such a clear disconnect between your quote and your examples that it didn't seem like you could possibly be asking your question in good faith. The definition of freedom of speech you found states ...


9

I agree with JJJ, and I'll add regarding this particular question (which turned out to be about the Halle flag) that I think the context of this question, in which the flag to be identified was displayed next to one that was clearly related to modern day politics (i.e. next to that of Identitäre Bewegung Deutschland) makes it squarely on-topic. Also ...


7

To add to the other two answers, I think the reason this question got such a negative response is that this question has been asked so many times, and people are just kind of annoyed at seeing it again. This isn't necessarily your fault since you didn't post it multiple times, though we do expect you to take some effort to search for duplicates before ...


7

I'm not sure about the number of downvotes. Since questions about free speech come around more often and it considers a politicized issue (President Trump and social media), the downvoters may feel that a lack of research is reason for voting the way they did. As for the expletive term in the quote, I don't think it requires moderator intervention. It's part ...


6

Another kind of push question is an argument described as a question. Here at politics.se we ask for questions that can be answered objectively, and people occasionally try to sneak in an argument by tacking on an objective question at the end of their post. This question is often just pretence and is superfluous to the rest of the post, and the answer is ...


5

Personally, I don't "s/he" is very elegant (see also this post on ELU from before the discussion on Meta started). I don't object to using singular they, so for me it's easy to use that. From your perspective with stylistic choices in mind, I would try to avoid them both. I've stated a few examples at the end of my answer which show that it's quite ...


1

The winner in 1988 was: From the video: Mary Matalin with Bush '88 campaign: We wanted to make a parody; if you wanted to caricature what common sense Americans thought of the rabid anti-war liberals, that was your picture. Matt Bennett with Dukakis '88 campaign (and who "helped stage the infamous 'Dukakis in a tank' photo-op that helped sink Michael ...


1

Yeah, I agree that such borderline cases are debatable whether they should merely be closed. I don't know if this is good practice or not, but in one such case where the answer was included in a larger answer to another question, I copied out the relevant portion of that answer and posted it as community wiki (under the new question). Although I didn't vote ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible