45

You need to be more careful with balance. There are a wide variety of 'formal' political organizations, from all sides of the political spectrum: the NRA, the NAACP, the League of Women Voters, the US Chamber of Commerce, American Crossroads, Democracy Matters, the College Republicans, etc. There are also a large number of organized groups that have a ...


39

This question was posted by a user who has been trolling the network by creating sock-puppets and posting low-quality questions with an intention to get a reaction. This person is not welcome to participate on our network and should not be posting questions or answers - it's not an automatic artifact of the merge (the merge by itself doesn't trigger the ...


34

While I personally don't think that the answer is necessarily the best answer provided so far (I personally didn't vote on it and upvoted a different one), I don't agree that it does not answer the question. It starts with: A new*, deliberately pejorative, term to describe an old phenomenon, that of pressuring individuals or companies through the media when ...


24

Because sometimes people aren't rational. In fact, I'd argue that people are rarely rational, liberals and highly-educated people included. Most of our behavior is driven by factors other than pure, cold rationality – things like religion, tribalism, nationalism, patriotism, and the desire for the respect of our friends and neighbors, to name just a few. If ...


23

This question was automatically (edit: apparently manually - see Cesar's answer) deleted when the poster's account was merged with an account currently serving a network-wide suspension. This has occurred recently - see the timeline for this question, for example. In that case, the post was undeleted by (Pol.SE mod) JJJ, in part due to it being well-received ...


23

The recent US presidential election and its aftermath are very emotional for a lot of people. US society seems politically polarized like it wasn't since the civil war, and there appears to be a strong "us vs. them" mentality in many people. As a result, some people will nervously judge every word posted online meticulously looking for hidden dog ...


22

It doesn't work, because it doesn't fit the model: Ask questions, get answers, no distractions A politician isn't interested in answering the question. A politician wants to get votes. Good answers are voted up and rise to the top. But if questions and answers are partisan, then "popular answers rise to the top". That is different. Moreover ...


20

I don't think you can every prove good faith – no matter what rules or advice we give, there will be concern trolls who are happy to abuse them. I think the best thing you can do is interact with the people reacting to your question and work hard to address their concerns. Generally, it's a matter of switching to a neutral-point-of-view, removing leading ...


20

I want to spell out what the core of this dispute is, because I think that will help you guys as you try to establish policy about answers like mine. So... There is an essential confusion about what constitutes a 'discussable' group, not just here but generally. There are many groups that we are perfectly comfortable discussing politically: political parties;...


19

What appears to have happened is primarily that some people misinterpreted the post as saying "white supremacist organizations, such as: the Ku Klan and the NRA." In my opinion, it's an fairly easy misinterpretation to make: it's precisely what I thought the post was trying to say, until I read the respondent's explanation. Since, by their own admission, ...


19

This was your third bounty on the question. The first one was a blatant attempt at bypassing the comment lock on the question. I removed it, and send you a private message explaining the purpose of the bounty message feature. You responded to the message by posting a new bounty with a completely off topic message, a rant about the site. That's what got you ...


18

Let me respond to a vague question full of quotes with a related quote by Randall Munroe (webcomic author): Alt-text: I can't remember where I heard this, but someone once said that defending a position by citing free speech is sort of the ultimate concession; you're saying that the most compelling thing you can say for your position is that it's not ...


18

If you look at the question under the democratic-primary tag and sort by date, then you will notice that most of the questions were asked in 2019 and 2020. During that time the Republicans had an incumbent President, so the Republican primaries in that election period were mostly a formality. Which explains why there was little interest in that topic. I am ...


17

Wow, thank you to the community for your support, and especially to the other candidates for stepping up! Congratulations also to JJJ, I'm looking forward to working with you and the rest of the moderation team! :)


17

I think these flag questions are okay in general. Flags are a type of political messaging, meant to convey one's affiliation. In that sense, I would compare them to rhetoric questions which ask about the meaning of political messages. Just like an insignia or a slogan, a flag can be a way to convey such a message. These flag questions are mostly objective, ...


16

If you're referring to this answer, it's already been flagged by another user, so there's nothing you need to do. [Update: the answer has indeed been deleted, and the user suspended.] In future, my advice would be that if you think something is racist, just go ahead and flag it. Racism is indeed against the Stack Exchange Code of Conduct, and will be dealt ...


15

It depends. Rigidly clinging to political or scientific dogma or political correctness, and refusing to reconsider, may be anti-intellectual. If it is censorship depends on the details. Insisting that debate -- on a web forum or in an academic institution -- is on topic and that it meets standards of politeness and mutual respect is not censorship. If people ...


15

Simply put it is a question that already knows the answer that it is looking for or more specifically is a question that is looking to support the position of that author and does not care about any answers that does not support that belief. A simplified example of a push question would be asking if something is true and providing evidence of why the author ...


14

It's not a CoC violation. It's not smart by any stretch, but a CoC violation would have been a direct attack. Something along the lines of All [members of this political party] should die in a dumpster fire What Ted posted was more of a diatribe. It's not untrue, but he's juxtaposing his cariacatures of the Right so he has a straw-man to knock down in his ...


13

Let's start with the title. Simple arithmetic question The purpose of the title is to make a question recognizable. If someone else comes to the website with the exact same question, would they recognize that this is the question they are about to ask? No, because this title says absolutely nothing about the topic of the question. It could be about the GDP ...


13

Although I don't know the full context of this statement, it appears to be a textbook example of bigotry and racism which goes contrary to the Stack Exchange Code of Conduct. Politics Stack Exchange is a community for people from all nations and cultures. Therefore we do not tolerate it when nations or culture groups are described in such disparaging terms. ...


13

It got closed because it appeared to be seeking a specific answer when you had cherry picked portions of the speech and highlighted a few sections that appeared to want to show what you wanted. Once the question was edited to remove any appearances of searching for the answer you wanted the problems it had got solved. In the end as it is now I think it is an ...


12

I don't think that such questions would be very useful for this website, because the answers would be mostly speculative. We can not read the mind of the editor who chose this picture, so we can not answer reliably what they want to intentionally convey with this image and what's just coincidence. If one really tried, then you could interpret something into ...


12

The close reason for this ("the primary purpose of this question appears to be to promote or discredit a specific political cause, group or politician") was proposed here. In the simpler terms mentioned there, such questions are a "rant in disguise". If I were to make finer typology of such questions: The most obvious case is when ...


12

Personally, I don't think "s/he" is very elegant (see also this post on ELU from before the discussion on Meta started). I don't object to using singular they, so for me it's easy to use that. From your perspective with stylistic choices in mind, I would try to avoid them both. I've stated a few examples at the end of my answer which show that it's ...


12

The only objective way to answer this question is to provide the intended meaning used by the majority of people who use that term. By all means: find the objective survey that establishes how the majority of people use the term. I couldn't. What's easy enough to find is expert opinion that backs up the answer you say is not objective: In that usage, "...


12

The currency tag should be used for such questions as: Politics of placing an image on currency, or Revaluation of currency (exchange rates), or The use of a particular currency for international trade. The money tag should be used for such questions as: Budgets, or Campaign limits, or In general, where the question is not specific to currency. The ...


11

I deleted this post as inappropriate for this website because it made generalizing and insulting accusations about a political faction of people. It contained phrases like: For [politician] and his supporters, the only thing that matters — and I cannot over-stress that it is the only thing that matters to them — is generating the sense or appearance of ...


11

Users with 5,000 reputation or more can share graphs from the site analytics but for the number of questions, we also have the Stack Exchange Data Explorer. This graph (source) shows the number of questions per day (averaged over a week). Yes, the number of questions spiked during the elections, but since then the situation returned to normal 2020 levels.


11

I can't speak for all the downvotes, but I was one of them for a reason that came up several times in the comments and was pointed out in the answers: there is such a clear disconnect between your quote and your examples that it didn't seem like you could possibly be asking your question in good faith. The definition of freedom of speech you found states ...


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