28 votes

A full and objective description of good faith?

Good Faith involves the following Be Serious - As Sam I Am noted, there was a recent unserious answer that was upvoted and defended. People liked the snarkyness and the political jabs. A serious ...
Machavity's user avatar
  • 48.2k
22 votes
Accepted

How do I prove my question is asked in good faith?

I don't think you can every prove good faith – no matter what rules or advice we give, there will be concern trolls who are happy to abuse them. I think the best thing you can do is interact with the ...
divibisan's user avatar
  • 25.9k
19 votes
Accepted

Should we limit the use of the term "dog whistle"?

Show, don't tell Or rather, cite, don't assert. If a post claims something to be a dog whistle, it should support that claim with sources, just like any other claim. The term is well-defined, see for ...
SQB's user avatar
  • 2,428
18 votes

A full and objective description of good faith?

How to be partisan on Politics.stackexchange Here's a typical partisan answer: Barack Obama is corrupt and gives money to his union cronies. It happened [ here ] (partisanSite). This is bad bad bad. ...
lazarusL's user avatar
  • 11k
17 votes
Accepted

Does claiming someone is dog-whistling go against "assuming good faith"?

"Assume good faith" is not one of those decisions where either option is fine as long as everyone agrees to stick to it. It's a basic rule of politeness, very similar to the golden rule - if you ...
Dmitry Grigoryev's user avatar
11 votes

Does claiming someone is dog-whistling go against "assuming good faith"?

The key here is to be shrewd about what the author is trying to do. Let me illustrate this by using spam. We allow users to post links to SO/SE. There are good and bad reasons to post links, but there'...
Machavity's user avatar
  • 48.2k
11 votes

A full and objective description of good faith?

Good Faith according to Dictionary.com: accordance with standards of honesty, trust, sincerity, etc. (usually preceded by in) Questions: The purpose of asking a question is to get an answer. In ...
Sam I am says Reinstate Monica's user avatar
10 votes

Please reword the "good faith" close reason

I don't see this as an attack. In fact, I tend to see this as a course correction for the questioner. Because we're Politics, we have to be prepared for the skewed questions trying to masquerade as ...
Machavity's user avatar
  • 48.2k
8 votes

Should we limit the use of the term "dog whistle"?

No we shouldn't ban this word because it does have its use even if it makes some people uncomfortable. I would argue that the question/answer that triggered this shows that it is okay to use. While ...
Joe W's user avatar
  • 16.4k
8 votes
Accepted

Can the core of the recent question addressing attacks on Biden's mental state be saved?

Frankly this doesn't strike me as a good question, even factoring out the problematic assertions. The "how comes" question has a fairly trivial answer in that Trump has focused a lot on ...
Dolphin 613 Motorboat's user avatar
7 votes

Does "political cause, group or politician" include national governments?

Yes, it does. We do not want political propaganda on this website. That means we don't want questions which are primarily designed to make the government of one country look good and/or another ...
Philipp's user avatar
  • 76.2k
7 votes

Does claiming someone is dog-whistling go against "assuming good faith"?

How to deal with Dog Whistles Are you sure it's a "dog whistle?" If there's not an easily understood charitable explanation, it's just bigotry and violates the code of conduct. If it's not a real ...
lazarusL's user avatar
  • 11k
7 votes

Should we limit the use of the term "dog whistle"?

While the accusation of a "dog whistle" can certainly be used as an ad hominem fallacy, there's no immediate necessity that it is. It's not even per se a fallacy to point out a sentence ...
haxor789's user avatar
  • 3,790
6 votes

Does claiming someone is dog-whistling go against "assuming good faith"?

In this day and age, you can reasonably assume good faith on every Stack Exchange except this one. I agree with divibisan that "unintentional bigotry is just as hurtful as intentional bigotry". But I ...
Denis de Bernardy's user avatar
5 votes

Should we limit the use of the term "dog whistle"?

We should not limit the use of the term "dog whistle". There is a long tradition of using dog whistles in politics, even though it might not have been labeled as such for more than "...
hlovdal's user avatar
  • 101
5 votes

Sincere, honest, open-minded question closed as "not good faith"

It is not strictly about "good faith". It is about appearance. From the close reason: The primary purpose of this question appears to be to promote or discredit a specific political cause, ...
Rick Smith's user avatar
4 votes

Should questions based on assumptions require references?

Questions based on assumptions do not require references, but good questions should include references. In other words, when the assumptions in the question are not obvious, ask for references. And if ...
Timur Shtatland's user avatar
4 votes

A full and objective description of good faith?

Disclaimer: I'm not a moderator. I can't understand a mind of someone who's willing to do such an onerous job. So I can't speak for one :) However, I noticed one answer (Dodd-Frank one I was reading ...
user4012's user avatar
  • 92.2k
3 votes
Accepted

Should lack of "good-faith effort to learn (..)" be linked to a clear part of the question?

I think this doesn't just apply to this particular close reason but to all close reasons. Never assume malice when incompetence is a proper explanation. When a user makes unconstructive contributions,...
Philipp's user avatar
  • 76.2k
3 votes

Should questions based on assumptions require references?

No, we should not required for the simple fact that if someone is asking a question about something they are unlikely going to be able to find references for this. If there is a question that appears ...
Joe W's user avatar
  • 16.4k
3 votes

Please reword the "good faith" close reason

I take the current wording of the close reason as being for situations where someone posted a question which isn't actually intended to ask a question, but rather to express some political view. In ...
reirab's user avatar
  • 8,267
3 votes

Sincere, honest, open-minded question closed as "not good faith"

Additionally, I suggest, at the very least, you break down that Q in several. Just look at your last para, which I've bullet-ized here: Also, how did the current situation even arise in the first ...
Dolphin 613 Motorboat's user avatar
2 votes

Sincere, honest, open-minded question closed as "not good faith"

"I think [this thing] is evil, convince me I'm right" is, in a nutshell, what you ask. There are indicators (i.e. using the word dumping) showing us this. This means, objectively, you are ...
CGCampbell's user avatar
  • 1,300
2 votes

Please reword the "good faith" close reason

I think we determined a slightly different definition of good faith rather than the dictionary definition when we discussed the word in this post
SleepingGod's user avatar
  • 8,437

Only top scored, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible