21

Good Faith involves the following Be Serious - As Sam I Am noted, there was a recent unserious answer that was upvoted and defended. People liked the snarkyness and the political jabs. A serious question can contain jabs, but it needs to have a real point. Good Faith means that you're not solely playing (or pandering) to an audience. Defensible viewpoints - ...


20

I don't think you can every prove good faith – no matter what rules or advice we give, there will be concern trolls who are happy to abuse them. I think the best thing you can do is interact with the people reacting to your question and work hard to address their concerns. Generally, it's a matter of switching to a neutral-point-of-view, removing leading ...


19

"Assume good faith" is not one of those decisions where either option is fine as long as everyone agrees to stick to it. It's a basic rule of politeness, very similar to the golden rule - if you assume bad faith and act accordingly, people will readily see bad faith in your actions too. For instance, if I write a post complaining that busing is bad for the ...


16

How to be partisan on Politics.stackexchange Here's a typical partisan answer: Barack Obama is corrupt and gives money to his union cronies. It happened [ here ] (partisanSite). This is bad bad bad. Barack Obama and unions are bad. Comments: ObamaFan1138:No way Barack Obama is the best! Unions are good you're opinion is wrong OP: No your wrong Partisan ...


10

I don't see this as an attack. In fact, I tend to see this as a course correction for the questioner. Because we're Politics, we have to be prepared for the skewed questions trying to masquerade as serious. As we've seen, people will gladly upvote and even defend bad faith things that fit their political view. We need something stronger than Please don't ...


10

Good Faith according to Dictionary.com: accordance with standards of honesty, trust, sincerity, etc. (usually preceded by in) Questions: The purpose of asking a question is to get an answer. In order for a question to be in "Good Faith", it's purpose needs to be to be to obtain an answer. Rhetorical questions are not in good faith. Push Polling ...


10

The key here is to be shrewd about what the author is trying to do. Let me illustrate this by using spam. We allow users to post links to SO/SE. There are good and bad reasons to post links, but there's also a grey area. On other sites a question like this would be permitted I have some code not working Some code here You can see it here https://www....


8

Frankly this doesn't strike me as a good question, even factoring out the problematic assertions. The "how comes" question has a fairly trivial answer in that Trump has focused a lot on personal attacks. (I see the currently top-voted answer to the question just elaborates on this.) Maybe this is news/interesting to some, but others clearly ...


7

How to deal with Dog Whistles Are you sure it's a "dog whistle?" If there's not an easily understood charitable explanation, it's just bigotry and violates the code of conduct. If it's not a real dog whistle, don't call it a dog whistle. Be nice, assume good intent on the part of the other person. Don't say: This is a bigoted dog whistle. I'm ...


4

In this day and age, you can reasonably assume good faith on every Stack Exchange except this one. I agree with divibisan that "unintentional bigotry is just as hurtful as intentional bigotry". But I disagree with the idea that we should always seek to fix such posts, because doing so means that bad faith users may end up getting upvotes. If that happens ...


4

I think this doesn't just apply to this particular close reason but to all close reasons. Never assume malice when incompetence is a proper explanation. When a user makes unconstructive contributions, then our goal should not be to drive them off the site. Our goal should be to teach them how to use the website in a more constructive manner. The ...


3

I take the current wording of the close reason as being for situations where someone posted a question which isn't actually intended to ask a question, but rather to express some political view. In that case, I think it's perfectly fair to say that it's not a question asked as a good-faith learning effort, but rather an attempt to abuse the Q/A system as a ...


3

Disclaimer: I'm not a moderator. I can't understand a mind of someone who's willing to do such an onerous job. So I can't speak for one :) However, I noticed one answer (Dodd-Frank one I was reading today) deleted with such a wording; ironically right before I saw the link to this Meta question. In that case; I happen to fully agree that it was indeed an ...


2

I think we determined a slightly different definition of good faith rather than the dictionary definition when we discussed the word in this post


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