9

This problem is as old as Stack Exchange, I guess. In the end the question author has sole authority to decide which answer to accept. We can not override their decision, except by removing the answer altogether. What you can do is: Post a comment on the question where you express your concerns about their choice of accepted answer. Hope they reconsider. ...


9

One problem that many of the questions have had is that they feel like the poster has an agenda. In this case, the question seems to be promoting that the group of Americans known as black or African-American establish a separate, virtual country. Or a separate, land-based country--it's not quite clear. As a general rule, we consider questions with an ...


6

I voted to close the question because I found it to be rambling and unclear what was actually being asked. No more, no less. I also left a comment to that effect. Paring it down to succinctly address the actual question (which appears to be about forming a landless state?) would be enough for me to retract my vote or vote to reopen. As a general rule, if ...


6

Although I answered the question, the problems with it were obvious to me: too many possible sub-questions with no clear focus on any, as well as the fairly speculative nature of the whole question. In my answer, I basically had to quickly go over all possible scenarios that came to my mind as to how a recent enough [quasi]independence cases might translate ...


4

I have a problem with this specific meta question because it seems to suggest that there are people who are not biased or viewpoints which are not biased. I don't think such people or viewpoints can exist for political questions. I think what you really mean are people who are asking rhetorical questions because they already know the answer. Those people ...


4

There's actually a gold badge for this: Populist, where your question gets way more upvotes than the accepted answer. You're not going to get away from it, sadly. Accepted answers are, by definition, solely within the purview of the OP, and indicate the approval of the OP as answering their question, biases and all. An accepted answer does not necessarily ...


2

The accepted answer problem is very old and hard to tackle even for sites where "bias" is not that strong such as in Politics.SE (e.g. StackOverflow). This meta question deals with why the accepted answer is on top by default, regardless of its quality. Cannot find one example now, but I saw an accepted answer with score -20 on SO simply because that answer ...


2

Most of the readers of this site are not in India. As such, a basic understanding of Indian politics should not be required to read a question. As is, the largely European and American readership is going to see demonetization and go "Huh?" By contrast, readers of Stack Overflow will mostly be computer science majors (current or past), who should know ...


1

I've attempted to clarify it somewhat, by retitling with adjectives and reording. See revised version: Objective minimum prerequisites for an independent modern sovereign nation-state by alienated African-Americans? Most of the text is an attempt to anticipate objections, (understandable given the enthusiasm here for peremptory closings of guest271314's ...


1

While I don't think it should be a specific requirement, it's one of those things that makes your question more likely to be answered. If someone can learn everything they need to just from looking at it, without doing loads more reading, they're far more likely to take time to respond to it. In this specific instance, from reading the term "Modi's ...


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