17

I think these flag questions are okay in general. Flags are a type of political messaging, meant to convey one's affiliation. In that sense, I would compare them to rhetoric questions which ask about the meaning of political messages. Just like an insignia or a slogan, a flag can be a way to convey such a message. These flag questions are mostly objective, ...


10

One way would be to post a bounty on them. One of the standard reasons is exactly for these cases: Current answers are outdated The current answer(s) are out-of-date and require revision given recent changes. If you can (suggest an) edit the question to significantly improve it, that will bump the question and maybe draw some extra attention. But you ...


10

I agree with JJJ, and I'll add regarding this particular question (which turned out to be about the Halle flag) that I think the context of this question, in which the flag to be identified was displayed next to one that was clearly related to modern day politics (i.e. next to that of Identitäre Bewegung Deutschland) makes it squarely on-topic. Also ...


9

Without concerning ourselves on meta with the actual content of these tweets, should content removed from other sites by hosting companies be automatically considered off-topic for Politics Stack Exchange? While I agree with your self-answer in general, I think it's more of a gradual slope where questions can become off-topic. Specifically, I think there ...


8

Perhaps the rejection reason isn't 100% accurate, but it looks like you're trying to post a new answer. You can't, since the question is closed, but that is no reason to edit an existing answer and trying to put your words in the author's mouth. When you edit a post, there's this widget which says "clarify meaning without changing it". It is also ...


6

It worth noting that there's a post notice for these very questions: This post relates to a rapidly changing event. Only ♦ moderators can apply and remove these notices. There are currently two questions on Politics Stack Exchange which have this notice: What options are left, if Britain cannot decide? Did Erdoǧan cheat in the 2018 election? You can find ...


5

I would suggest placing a bounty on the question with outdated answers. There is even an option for this on the bounty dialog: In the specific case linked in this question, the original suggested duplicate question was closed for being opinion-based, so a bounty couldn't be started in this situation. However, as the community decided that the original was ...


4

You proposed a huge edit to a question that's (at least for me) essentially a separate answer.


4

It's always a good idea to look at highly up voted questions. Two tags come to mind here: summary-request: Questions explaining concepts (e.g. sovereignty), organisations (e.g. the EU) or events (e.g. Brexit) in simple terms without assuming much prior knowledge of the subject These summary requests are meant as introductions to a subject. It's hard to ...


4

Here's my attempt to answer this question: You should choose which site to ask your question on based on the kind of answer you're hoping to get, taking into account the users' fields of expertise. So, a macroeconomics question posted on Economics.SE is going to get answered by people with an Economics background and is likely to be (on average) more ...


4

I think it's on topic as long as the specific current event is related to politics as defined in the help center. For example, events related to Brexit, an election, diplomacy, the United Nations are in scope. If certain officials have a relation to those events, then asking for their (public) response should be in scope as well. Of course, if the current ...


4

I guess I should self answer. No, a "what did they say" question cannot be off-topic unless the person in the question and what they're talking about is clearly not political. The linked existing meta about Fox New commentators makes clear that the statements of political actors are on topic. And there isn't really a much bigger political actor ...


3

I do not think these are appropriate types of question. The problem is that this type of question merely stacks one opinion against another opinion, disregarding anything factual or objective about the case. It becomes a mechanism for ad hominem attacks, since the targeted side is obliged to argue for its own innocence against an otherwise unsubstantiated ...


2

Some had terrible answers and had positive scores still. Not to offend anyone. Those accounts seem dead. I think for this particular negative aspect of the questions you are referring to, the normal way is to downvote these answers if they are clearly not accurate. The downvote button's tooltip suggests this: This answer is not useful Of course, if the ...


1

Generally speaking, political theory is meta-politics. If a question is about a specific political outcome, institution, or event (or even classes of such), that's political science proper; if a question is about political systems or abstract ideologies, you've gotten into political theory. We can divide both these up into subcategories: political science ...


1

I think it would be a mistake to do so. It can potentially create confusion for future readers, and I don't believe it would provide enough benefit to outweigh potential drawbacks of backlash from some post authors. Questions are asked at a specific point in time (visible on each question), and are answered at a point in time after that. Editing the tense ...


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