12

This question is definitely off-topic here on Politics Stack Exchange. The help center article about what's on-topic on politics stack exchange says: Politics Stack Exchange is for objective questions about governments, policies and political processes. Is it a question about governments or policies? No, it's not the government which tells you to not state ...


11

I can't speak for all the downvotes, but I was one of them for a reason that came up several times in the comments and was pointed out in the answers: there is such a clear disconnect between your quote and your examples that it didn't seem like you could possibly be asking your question in good faith. The definition of freedom of speech you found states ...


10

I think your downvotes both here and there are more about your own misrepresentations or misinterpretations. You start off with a pretty aggressive tone and never stop to reflect on what others provide to you as feedback. I don't personally believe that points to the user-base here being biased, but rather the OP themselves. I was not around to witness this ...


10

This is a type of question that tends to get downvotes. The structure is : The reason for a certain law is X Y and Z. But X Y and Z are not good reasons for this law Therefore this law is wrong. Prove me wrong... There are lots of questions like this about drug law What's the point of legalising dangerous drugs in some states in the US? Why are many ...


10

The purpose of the bounty message is to explain the expectations from the bounty winner. It is not a substitute for comments. It is a lot more visible than regular comments, and cannot be flagged, upvoted or replied to. Using it as a comment is an abuse of the feature, intentional or not. I removed the bounty. If the user is interested in investing their ...


8

Frankly this doesn't strike me as a good question, even factoring out the problematic assertions. The "how comes" question has a fairly trivial answer in that Trump has focused a lot on personal attacks. (I see the currently top-voted answer to the question just elaborates on this.) Maybe this is news/interesting to some, but others clearly ...


7

To add to the other two answers, I think the reason this question got such a negative response is that this question has been asked so many times, and people are just kind of annoyed at seeing it again. This isn't necessarily your fault since you didn't post it multiple times, though we do expect you to take some effort to search for duplicates before ...


7

I'm not sure about the number of downvotes. Since questions about free speech come around more often and it considers a politicized issue (President Trump and social media), the downvoters may feel that a lack of research is reason for voting the way they did. As for the expletive term in the quote, I don't think it requires moderator intervention. It's part ...


6

Those are generally on-topic questions, e.g. questions of the first category they usually fall under the comparative-politics tag. Be more careful with the #2 & #3. There are some questions like those too e.g. Which are the advantages of monarchy? but it sometimes can become a mostly [SE user] opinion-based question, e.g. if the policy proposal is ...


4

No, it's not. (See how uninformative an answer to such a q can be?) To copy my earlier comments here regarding the "Is Twitter biased" question, slightly edited for clarity: What I was trying to convey in my comments on the question before we were... ahem... interrupted (by the question being deleted) is that a question that simply asks for a ...


3

As a general rule, no single statement qualifies as propaganda. Propaganda is a systematic misrepresentation of facts in order to present a false, redacted, or misleading worldview as true. We could close any question of the type "Is statement X propaganda" as lacking sufficient information or context, with the guidance that the question needs to refer to a ...


3

Yes it is because what you may consider acceptable free speech someone else may consider unacceptable. Asking people on how to classify what is and isn't acceptable is going to get many different opinions on what should be allowed or not. A good example of this would be the debate with speakers on college campuses and how some of them are not allowed to ...


2

The title of the question is opinion-based. What is the decisive point for classifying a certain speech as unacceptable? The fact that there are very different laws and regulation around the world about what is and is not acceptable speech and that even in those countries the court rulings are all over the place should tell you that this is a question ...


2

The question appears to be asking for something, and there's a fundamental aspect missing from the vocabulary that is related to the concept being asked about. I think this is a relatively common thing when asking a question and expressing a genuine interest in a topic, and should not be discouraged. The biggest issue I see is that it is basically asking for ...


1

Questions about where to ask a question are generally asked on Big Meta, but I really don't think there's any place to ask this here, at least without any more information. One of the technical sites might allow questions about how to use Google Reports to get information on these visits. If you find some political link that you don't understand (for ...


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